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troops. i think we can all agree, at least i hope we can, that the taliban has morphed into a hybrid. it's one part terrorist organization, one part global drug trafficking organization. for the past two years virtually every heroin processing lab raided by the dea, united stat s special forces and afghan police had ties to the what our forces find when they raid drug labs is not only large quantities of opium and heroin,d but heroin, but also also im explosive devices, bomb making materials, and taliban training manuals. in just one raid last year, 2,056 pounds of the highest grade heroin with wholesale value of $6 million was seized. experts agree it may take many years to get the drug trade in afghanistan under control. therefore, as the united states military begins to scale back its presence this month, i think we've got to ensure our civilians continue to support counter narcotics efforts in afghanistan. i think that's really important. a year ago this month this caucus released a bipartisan report entitled united states counter narcotics strategy in afghanistan, which
forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afghan police but there has been real progress in the last two ye
, but reconciliation in general, reports of united states meetings with taliban officials? and, also, what pakistan can bring to the table. pakistan has talked frequently about needing to have a seat at the table. what do you bring to the table? the americans have said you need to, you need to, um, either sever your relationship, for example, with the haqqani network or bring them into this, into this process. what can pakistan do in order to make this process work better? >> first of all, we support a reconciliation in afghanistan because we understand that wars, essentially, always end through some kind of reconciliation and talks anyway. so the reconciliation process in afghanistan has to be led by the afghans. it's their country. and to bring to an end the internal conflict in afghanistan that started after the departure of the soviets way back, '89 the soviets went, their clients in kabul continued to hold on until after 1992 there was the famous civil war which then brought the taliban to power. so we do not want in any way to intervene in the internal afghan process. it has to be an afghan-led p
the various elements of the taliban and others. but of course in the conflict of building, helping, developing projects going on designed to do one big strategic thing wherever you look in the middle east and that is to shore up the strength and responsiveness of the state's wherever we look whether it's iraq or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail, the idea of the two-stage solution for israel and palestine or all within the concept of the system and if we don't have strong response things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground and a travel to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military you have an incredibly confident will lead military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the government's of the afghan states and institutions provide and and pushing we just never quite get there. it's hard to find anybody -- >> guest: that's true, too. this brings us back to something like democratization and the culture in their view is going to be something where the people will have a way if you change those that are going
effective going into the villages to talk to them to get good information where the taliban is in what it means to get more cohesive to stand on their own so we can get out of afghanistan as well. >> women on are bringing a new dynamic to the front line. the way that we conduct warfare is constantly involved -- devolving. longer first-generation and type of maneuvers that required total upper body strength and hiking 4 miles and doing hand combat. that is very important right now on the battlefield, forces are finding themselves not only with infantry but also diplomat and peacemaker there is a necessity to have the role of discussing to find out ways to have conflict resolution with the birth -- what ever we have it. >> host: also the upper body strength is important but we do find women have better endurance on average can run or into were more -- and two were more. evade different sets of skills that requires both sets to be the most effective military that we have. how do the guys feel having women in the overall? you have some very interesting snippets about for example, one of th
being impressed upon the various elements, the taliban and others in afghanistan. but, of course, that is in the middle of a huge complex, building, helping, developing projects that really is designed to one big grand strategic thing. were every look in the middle east, and that is to shore up the strength, the responsiveness of the state. wherever we are looking whether it is with iraq or iran today, or afghanistan, to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail. the idea of a two-state solution for israel and palestine, and they are all within the concept of this international state. that is, we don't have strong response of state. things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground, and i travel often to afghanistan, is to be honest, with all the power of the u.s. military, we have an incredibly confident and well led military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the governance that the afghans and institutions provide. and so it's like, you know, pushing a rock up a hill. we just never quite get there. i'm sure you wouldn't disagree. it's hard
pakistan's failure to act against militant extremists like the network in the north, the afghan taliban and other militant extremists. we will be interested in hearing general dempsey's thoughts on how to get the pakistan military to go after terrorist groups finding sanctuary in pakistan's tribal regions. al qaeda and the arabian peninsula in yemen and al qaeda elements in somalia continue to take advantage of failing and failed states to train their operatives and to plan attacks against the united states and our interests. it is critical that we don't apply significant pressure to these terrorist organizations, and to work with governments and international organizations in the region to address the long term problems. iran remains probably the greatest risk to world peace and to regional stability. we share the concerns of many nations about iran's continued support of terrorist activities beyond its borders, development of its missile programs, and refusal to cooperate with the international atomic energy commission. while we've seen evidence that the international sanctions has pu
. we had the times square bomber inspired by them and had trained with the taliban in pakistan. yes, there are broader links but there are a few things at work here. number 1 a crippling political correctness, absolutely crippling. i think another thing, quite frankly, is that it's very difficult -- say that islam is not a religion of peace. say shari'a is a threat, that's a very difficult thing to come to grips with because that means you're at good with a good slice of the muslim population who does follow muslim fundamentally. who does follow shari'a to the t. that's a scary thing to admit for our government. >> host: and i want to go back to that because no less a person than george bush right after 9/11 said islam is a religion of peace. right after the young comes vo radical muslim walked into the airport in frankfurt and shot a couple of american soldiers, barack obama said one of the islam is one of the world's great religions. my sense we want to believe that because we are a tolerant people. but you've got quotes in this book from several known terrorists and conspirators
service, the isi come has close ties to the former current and the velte fund and start the taliban back in afghanistan and they started the ltte. the people would give the attacks in india as a counterweight to the military power. all those groups of operational connections now and the experts would be and are inclined to plan operations against the west both at home and abroad, so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal and how much would someone get a nuclear complex there's several ways. you could of the clandestine sale of materials which a.q., the father of the program for a number of years you could have a rogue officer take over the nuclear installation work you could have my scenario where the transit from the secured facilities to the front lines and the nuclear alert because that's where it's most vulnerable. so you have a combination of weapons, the country which is hostile, the security service which has ties to the jihadists and a lot of them have been indulged by the establishment and the security, and you have something that is a worry and i woul
 was the british public raging taliban and its own reflectio >> web tells us what people ally want is pornography because pornography still drive the web. so do we give people pornography? >> it's not for us to decide. >> if people want pornography, why are we giving it to them? >> they are. they're giving getting it. >> i haven't seen much of pornography. [laughter] >> someone quick ask another++ question.+++++++++ >> this is a high-minded question. >> thank++++++++++++ >> i'm gavin rees and i work fo the dog center.++++ and my question is we have sort of decided to the scandal that' own hiking is bad and so forth. for big wins in the family and+ people who have+ benefited did disasters in different ways,++ it's very the conversations they have that could be+ problemati there are journalists who+++ interview with great skill and+ there are others who do it less well in their other ways other+ than++++ phone hacking othe the stories they+ want.++++ looking
the taliban and al qaeda. tonight new evidence that this confidence is simply wrong. is part of this to do with a chill in relations between pakistan and washington? >> it is indeed of course. of course. desai's been a secret war as you like conducted by the cia in pakistan using these unmanned aircraft. if one looks at the history of it, one can see how it is ramped up but now there are questions in the wake -- of course the vast majority of these raids have been carried out in so-called tribal areas on the border with afghanistan, and over the years the number has gone up steadily. in the first few years in the strikes of 2,042,007 they're just a handful and then we see it going up in 2010. the obama administration rising at a policy never fully publicly articulated. 118 strikes last year and 45 so far this year. the pakistanis said a couple of months ago that they wanted him stopped them stopped and they ordered the cia out in their base in pakistan were some of the strikes are being launched. by my reckoning there is than a dozen since then. so has this been done like the enlightened r
the question of education is examined on an international scale. in 1996, the taliban and made it illegal for women to attend school in afghanistan. of this particular policy was discarded in 2001, similar deplorable circumstances still exists in afghanistan and around the world. the limitations and implications of existing education systems are far reaching, yet they are concrete steps that can be taken to work toward combating the cyclical and damaging nature of existing education systems or lack thereof. any institution international jurisdiction can and must answer to global education programs including early childhood in the case of programs. early so that education such as operation head start provides comprehensive health and education, and parent involvement to low-income families. providing technical skills and training to make individual valuable members of the workforce. sets educational programs can also be recognized for their economic dahlia. early sell their education as well as vocational training and educational opportunities are of viable and empowerment programs that mu
of united states meetings with taliban officials and also what pakistan can bring to the table? pakistan has talked frequently about needing to have a seat at the table. what do you bring to the table? the americans have said you need to either sever your relationship for example with the haqqani network or bring them into this process. what can pakistan do in order to make this process work better? >> first of all, we support a reconciliation in afghanistan because we understand that wars essentially always and through some kind of reconciliation and talks anyway. so, the reconciliation process in afghanistan has to be led at the afghans. it is their country, and to bring to an and the eternal conflict in afghanistan that started after the departure of the soviets way back in 89. the soviets -- continued to hold on and after 1992 there was the famous war that brought the taliban to power. so we did not want in any way to intervene in the internal afghan process. it has to be an afghan-led process. we are very closely in contact with the afghan leadership. president karzai has visited pakist
to former current jihadists. they help to find and the taliban to fight the russians. back in afghanistan. they fought and started the people he did the mumbai attacks in india. as a counterweight to india military power. all those groups have operational connections to each other now. the experts believe that they would be, and are inclined to plan operations against the west, both at home and abroad. so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal? how might someone need a nuclear bomb? there's several ways. you could have a rogue officer come you have a clandestine sale of materials which a.q. khan, the father of the nuclear program of pakistan before a number of years. you have a rogue officer taking over nuclear installation, or you can have my scenario where a bomb in transit from its secure facility the front lines in a nuclear, storm because that's where it's most one of the. you're the combination of weapons, a country which is hostile, a security service which has ties to jihadists. jihadists have been indulged on the establishment military and security, and
back here. we went to afghanistan to get the taliban out, get al qaeda out and to get osama bin laden. we got osama bin laden. al qaeda is no longer in afghanistan. and the taliban is gone. so what are we still doing there? why are we still there? why are we still spending about $14 billion a month in afghanistan? so, mr. president, again, we need a balanced approach. spending cuts alone won't do the job. i think the kweupbdz have -- i think the republicans have just proved this. republicans have proved that spending cuts alone will not get the job done. how do i say that? look at the republican budget, the so-called ryan budget. it dismandate also medicare, guts medicaid, makes severe cuts across the federal budget. yet it still adds trillions of dollars to the federal deficit for years to come largely because it refuses to touch tax breaks for the well-to-do or to raise other revenues from corporations. well, mr. president, the republicans have said they don't want to raise taxes on so-called job creators. they don't want to raise taxes on job creators. well, to call trust fund mill
operations in libya on other u.s. and nato military operations including operations against the taliban and al-qaeda in afghanistan. reporting on these issues is not provided for in the kerry-mccain resolution. given that the resolution would authorize military operations that could go on for as much as a year, and could expand in scope from current u.s. operations, i believe it's important that congress have the necessary tools to conduct oversight of these issues and to know their costs. i urge members to support the amendment. >> senator lugar, this is another excellent addition. i believe senator corker has the second degree, i think, originally senator lugar add 15-day reporting. i think the 60-day. and i think senator corker originally had 15 and i agreed to do 30 and i think that's reasonable for us to be able to have reasonable oversight. so senator corker do you want to propose your second degree and -- >> sure. i will acquiesce to our chairman and say 30-day reporting and i would like to change my amendment to a 30-day reporting and that's acceptable. >> any objection to modif
's history for the the taliban as is for any iraqi insurgency grew. so i think they now have an internal sort of safe haven. a lot of our folks, but i like to think sometimes there are areas that have no violence. that doesn't mean al qaeda doesn't control, they control so thoroughly that there is no violence. so i think we need to look at some of the other provinces, there is an absence of violence. it doesn't mean violence is absent, if you will. i think that everything they really need right now to plan, to fund anti-recruit. the internet makes it easy for them to influence which they have done repeatedly. >> so you would say whether it's comparing out of six months ago or even a year ago, you would say that aqap's capacity to launch an attack, a strike on our homeland has been enhanced as opposed to the greatest? >> their capacity to do so has been increased. we, of course, have responded to the various attacks and more preventive measures and in some cases going after them. but with an embassy that is on lockdown, on reduced many, we are not completely blind but we very much are operatin
's assessment is? the reconciliation in general, reports said the united states became taliban officials? and pakistan has talked frequently about needing a seat at the table. the americans have said you need to sever your relationship with the haqqani network lowered bring them into this process. what can pakistan do to make it work better? >> we support the reconciliation because we have understand the that wars always end through the reconciliation and talks anyway. the reconciliation process has to be led by the afghans. it is their country and with the internal conflict, and continued to hold the line and then there was the famous civil war. so we do not want to intervene in past abc's lead process and president karzai and our the jurors continually engaged with the leadership and koppel and afghanistan and the united states form the core group but they would slow the a engage others. it is one minute for me to play professor instead of ambassador. when the soviets left, regional powers adopt did different factions of those groups primarily to fight the soviet union. they created a
there are those -- >> were letters presented -- the letter sent by the taliban saying america's leaving in july, you better watch what you do, something to that effect? >> account identifier. >> would you agree the lisbon statement in 2014 was very helpful? >> it was. >> my question is, now that we've changed the strategy to withdraw timelines, have we sent the signal yet again of an uncertainty? it needs to be totality and commanders are renewed optimism and seems to be some of our allies going to iran and other places. my question is, do you believe that this more aggressive withdraw policy by the president has sent a signal of uncertainty or do you know? >> i think it's too early to tell, senator. >> rating affair. we're all pulling for you. let us know. god bless you all. >> you're in position. you do support that position, is that correct? >> i do. >> it is important that even though this apparently was mark pryor saved and general petraeus recommended, the military leaders of our country supports this decision newfield was an appropriate decision for the president to make. is that correct
failures. i think the search was a success. i think a failure was announcing to the taliban the dates you are going to withdraw because while they may not have watches they do have calendars and it makes it very difficult to negotiate with someone or to drive into the bargaining table or drive them away if they know they only have to hide out for certain period of time and they can come back in because you were gone. i think that was a mistake on his part. i think it was a mistake not to oversee the elections in such a way the government elections, to make sure they were held in a way that had public confidence in a government that was not corrupt and was focused on getting the country back on its feet. >> i think there are some lessons learned. one is that we have been there 10 years and it is time for the afghan people to be able to take responsibility for preserving the independence which has been fought for so valiantly by our soldiers. our men and women have made extraordinary sacrifices they are and frankly and other places in the history of this great nation. we do want to see the
ask you forces in the lead puts the lie to the taliban propaganda that international forces are there to occupy afghanistan. the afghans taken over their own security is the key to the strategy to success in afghanistan. admiral sandee winnefeld serves as commander of the north american aerospace defense command, norad was candidate. the capacities have been responsible for defense and homeland. military support to civil authorities to domestic emergencies as well as aerospace warning and control for north america. in its current capacity, he is the combatant commander responsible for the operation from the gmd mission. if confirmed as space chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, he would have a number of key roles and responsibilities related to missile defense. we will be interested to hear admiral winnefeld views on whether we should demonstrate correction of the two recent gm flight test failures before resending production or delivery of the kill vehicle for the gmd interceptors. the joint chairman of the chief of staff has a wide range of response abilities come includ
to bargain with the taliban over whether girls should be allowed to attend school." that's a pretty stark comparison, i admit, and i may not have gone that far, but frankly our republican brethren seem to hold to their ideology almost religiously. they see all things in black and white. they act as though they believe that those who disagree with that ideology are either unpatriotic or heretics and that the only truth is their truth. what they have forgotten is that negotiating with those with whom we disagree and reaching a compromise is what good governance is all about. the other falsehood here is spending is not a democratic value, as our friends on the other side would have us believe. it is a republican reality. it was the reckless spending of republicans combined with a reckless tax policy and an ideology that let wall street run wild, turning a free market into a free-for-all market that brought us to where we are today. let's remember it wasn't long ago that the budget was, in fact, balanced during another democratic administration, when we had budget surpluses as far as the eye
and who you guys believe might have been responsible for it, the taliban claimed responsibility and whether or not you think there's an increase in social security? >> well, i would say, obviously, that this is at a personal level. we are -- our prayers and sympathies are with the karzai family during this difficult time. the united states condemned in the strongest possible terms the murder of president karzai's half brother in kandahar. we obviously -- we don't know who's responsible. there's been some claims. we will certainly work with the afghan authorities on that. but the -- right now i think the moment here is one. it's a personal one. we express our condolences and condemn the murder. chris? >> some questions on "don't ask, don't tell" the 9th circuit issued an order barring the discussion on the law. is the president aware of the decision? >> is he aware of it? >> i'm sure he heard the news. >> the justice department is reviewing the order. i ill point you to further information. the president's decision on "don't ask, don't tell" on the repeal is clear. he fought hard
qaeda and the taliban, which has been in league with al qaeda. we have been over there losing american lives and spending american taxpayer dollars to protect our country from another 9/11. to say that we're going to cut $1 trillion in the future over the next ten years when we aren't placing the emphasis on what are the conditions on the ground is not sound policy and it's certainly not sound national security policy. so that's illusory. and then the other parts of the cuts that i think are very hard to decipher are cutting waste, fraud and abuse, which we all want to do, but we don't have the guarantee of those cuts. so i think it is important for us to look at the cuts and try to make sure that if we're going to raise the debt ceiling, we raise it only the amount of the actual cuts that we can produce. in the majority leader's -- majority leader reid's legislation, there is a joint committee. there is also one in the boehner bill. but in the majority leader's legislation, the committee has to report but its product doesn't have to be passed and enacted before the debt ceiling is lif
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24